Highlights Of The Week

– PROJECTS – 

Editor Katherine Lee cut the second episode of series 8 of The Supervetwhich aired Thursday night on Channel 4.

In the show, hard-to-cure pets receive cutting-edge care from ‘Bionic Vet’ Noel Fitzpatrick. You can watch the episode on demand on All 4.


– SPOTLIGHT – 

This week’s Spotlight interview is with one of our most recent sign ups, Paul Bernays, a first class editor who has cut pretty much everything – from landmark main channel documentaries to web, corporate and museum projects.

With strong creative and visual ideas, he is passionate about compelling storytelling and structure, ranging from emotionally hard hitting stories to comic light touches.


– HQ NEWS – 

On Tuesday Blueberry turned 15 years old and the team celebrated in style at All Star Lanes Bayswater with a fun night of dining, bowling and cocktails. Here’s to many more moons uniting creative minds with Blueberry!

Check out some photos from the evening on our Facebook.

Highlights Of The Week

Not just one but two Blueberry editors, Ian Baigent and Rob Franz, cut this week’s episode of Big Dreams Small Spaces, the new show where Monty Don works with amateur gardeners up and down the country to help them create the garden of their dreams. You can catch up on iPlayer.


One of our recent sign ups Chiraag Parmar, edited a short documentary commissioned by L’Oreal for Quite Frankly Productions about Jodie, a woman with learning difficulties who was given an opportunity to do a one year placement working with the cosmetics company. You can watch it right here on the left column.

Paul Bernays – Editor

Who is Paul Bernays?

I am an experienced editor and a great collaborator. Passionate about compelling storytelling, visual flow and the odd, finely-tuned nuance.

How did your career path develop?

I spliced audio tape and cine film as a child – anything I could lay my hands on – then took a filmmaking degree at the London College of Printing (a few years later an exec asked me if I was Oxford or Cambridge, to which I replied: ‘Elephant and Castle actually’).

I’ve been lucky to work with and learn from some greats: my first job was with the fantastic filmmaker Molly Dineen and later I assisted Dai Vaughan, who cut Roger Graef’s original groundbreaking observational documentaries.

What do you consider your greatest achievement/s so far?

Helping to make films and programmes that have been watched and enjoyed by thousands, sometimes millions of people. Right now I’m fascinated by how changing technologies give us amazing scope to explore new ways to tell and understand stories.

Any projects you are most proud of and why?

I’m proud of all the work I’ve contributed to fully and in the right way for that particular project to become the very best it can be. My favourite is a BBC film about Mose Allison, a blues singer I’m a huge fan of. I cut and honed the film until each edit felt exactly right.

Share your biggest lessons in life and work

Be open, friendly and hard-working. Editing is highly collaborative and it’s about taking on the director’s vision and aiming every decision towards that. Essentially, you choose shots and try agreed creative ideas.

You’ve got to take risks – but don’t take long about them, judge their success or move on quickly. With less skill and experience it’s like a long journey down a spiral staircase to get to the places the film needs to be but you learn to just jump and hit a lot of those points in single leaps!

View Paul’s full portfolio.

Highlights Of The Week

– PROJECTS –

Editor Aldo Paternostro cut the final episode of BBC Three’s Drugs Map of Britain. This landmark docu-series explores the drugs of choice in different parts of the UK. The episode is called Alcohol: Britain’s Most Harmful Drug and is now available to watch on iPlayer!


Adam Harvey edited the first episode of Pop Up Start Up, part business entertainment series, which gives 12 entrepreneurs a head-start through the expertise and guidance provided by some of the best business and retail brains in the UK.

Produced by small and medium business e-commerce expert Alibaba and by award winning London video agency Hub, the series airs on CNBC International on Friday nights at 11 pm and you can catch up with the highlights of the show on the official website!


– SPOTLIGHT –

This week’s Spotlight interview is with Adam Harvey, an experienced freelance editor with a strong sense of narrative, who works between factual entertainment and drama. His credits include Doctor Who, Doctors and Shipping Wars UK. His most recent work booked through Blueberry is an episode of Pop Up Start Up for Hub TV which just aired on CNBC. Read all about him on our website!


– HQ NEWS –

After many years in Shepherds Bush, the Blueberry Headquarters have moved! Our new address is 10 Redan House, 27 Redan Place, London, W2 4SA and our closest tube station is Queensway. Take note of the new location and come say hi! For a sneak peak a peak into our new office, check out our Facebook Page!

Adam Harvey – Editor

Who is Adam Harvey?

I am a storyteller. It doesn’t matter what software or hardware you use or prefer. You will never progress as an editor unless you can interpret the material and pull all the narrative threads of a potential story into a cohesive whole.

How did your career path develop?

I started off as a trainee floor manager and production runner in drama. After briefly considering a career in directing, it wasn’t long before I started helping the assistant editor of a popular ITV drama (circa 1996) each morning and through her, I got to know and chat to the film editors. My first edit was a wrap reel, cut on Lightworks.

I then joined the post production department of BBC’s Pebble Mill, before working as an assistant editor on Teletubbies and as junior editor for Formula One. After a brief spell in VFX Editing (one of the most high pressure environments I have ever encountered) I landed my first assistant editor gig in drama, and I ended up freelancing as a first assistant for ten years, working with a number of BAFTA-winning editors.

In 2014 I took the decision to abandon assisting and move into editing, initially in factual entertainment, until a door opened in drama (I had to push hard) and I got to cut a popular daytime soap. And that is where I am at the moment, a mixture of factual and drama.

What do you consider your greatest achievement/s so far?

Not giving up when the work wasn’t coming in. Freelancing in a high pressure environment is not for everyone, but I trust my abilities and know that there can be hard times. I’ve needed iron determination, but I’m still here, and still moving forward.

Any projects you are most proud of and why?

In 2012 I assisted on Doctor Who’s 50th Anniversary Film – An Adventure in Space and Time. I pulled it together with brilliant editor Philip Kloss and the director, utilising spit and polish and a fair amount of improvisation to get it done. Very long hours and very stressful but the final result was lovely. And I got to recreate the TARDIS dematerialising 1960s style in Avid, with the original sound effects. My other highlight would be from last last year, cutting my first episode of Doctors.

Share your biggest lessons in life and work

I’m not the sort of editor who likes to take his work home and I don’t currently have an editing system of my own. So I guess my biggest lesson is the one that has allowed me to balance work and life without upsetting either one. I think it is very important to separate them and to maintain harmony in what can be a truly demanding environment. Another lesson I learned is to not be afraid to ask for advice/help and to ignore those who seek to belittle you – they are probably insecure.

View Adam’s Full Portfolio